Friday, 5 September 2008

Image of the week #1

This is an idea that I've blatantly stolen from the Clastic Detritus blog. Each Friday I'll put up an image: probably mainly field photographs, but also computer-generated images and such like from my digital outcrop mapping research.


This week's image is a nice example of a fault zone from the Suez rift, Egypt (There will probably be a lot of images from Egypt in this series). This is the Nukhul fault, juxtposing Cretaceous chalk of the pre-rift Sudr Formation against the syn-rift Miocene Abu Zenima and Nukhul formations. A sliver of Eocene pre-rift Darat Formation is caught between the paired slip surfaces of the main fault zone, and is internally deformed. In the hanging wall of the main fault zone (to the right), a series of minor faults occur in a damage zone about 50 m wide. The minor faults tip out downward, with one fault showing a duplex pattern near its tip as it merges into bedding.

8 comments:

Callan Bentley said...

Nice image! I like the annotations -- makes this a very information rich bunch of pixels. Thanks for sharing -- looking forward to seeing how the series develops.

Silver Fox said...

Nice first image of the week! I like the annotations also. Interesting how some of the faulting with tilting of beds - near the detachment surface - is opposite in direction to faulting (and minor tilting) along the other faults.

dmonte said...

I enjoyed the picture and look forward to others, especially those dealing with sediments and rifting. Modeling of rifting is a major topic of study at my university. I also enjoyed the annotation however would enjoy an unannotated graphic to attempt to see what you have mapped.

BrianR said...

nice! the annotation is fantastic

Mich said...

Great idea (whoever came up with it)!

I agree with dmonte about the need to post an unannotated image along side the annotated one. It's a bit frustrating not being able to see where your interpretation came from. There's no room for debate either!

Paul Wilson said...

Cheers all for your comments. By 'popular' demand, I've added an uninterpreted version of the image.

Paul Wilson said...

dmonte, just out of interest, which university are you at?

Julie said...
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